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Judith Brown

When they put the elk back. ARE THEY GOING TO DO IT RIGHT THIS TIME. NOT BACKWARDS LIKE LAST TIME. THE PARKS BUREAU HAD A BRAIN FREEZE AND FACED THE ELK SO PEOPLE CAN SEE ITS IT HIND END

Val Ballestrem

Thanks, Brian, for providing this helpful background on the Elk and Thompson. It is good to know that it wasn't terribly damaged. I wish the same could be said for the base, which, like the one at Skidmore Fountain served a practical purpose, much as the statue serves an inspirational one.

Bob Clay

Thank you Brian for sharing an update on the status of the Elk, reminding us of its origins and historic context and the good news that there is a chance for Portlanders to be reunited again someday.

Mark Appleby

We do love our Elk! Every time I pass, I feel a sense of serenity, dignity, & power.

Do we know for sure that Elk is a male? were you able to confirm that during your visit?

Aaron

It is interesting that this story frames the elk as a shine to BLM and that the BLM protesters were not trying to destroy it. In the Oregonian July 3rd. It states

"A statue of an elk dating to 1900 has been removed for safekeeping after BLM protesters in Portland, Oregon, set fire to its base, The Oregonian reports.“There is concern the elk statue could topple over and injure someone,” police say, according to KATU. The fires have badly damaged the statue’s stone base and tagged it with graffiti. It’s not clear why protesters have targeted the statue, normally part of summer fountain, except that it stands outside the city’s justice center downtown, a focus for protests, KGW reported."

This clearly states that they were targeting it most likely because of it being adjacent to the justice center and that they were fearful of additional damage or destruction from BLM. This article seems to dampen the actual reason it and to be removed. It has stood for over 120 years with no problem. Hmmm.

Scott

This was a wonderful article. Thank you for all the history and context. I kept expecting you to talk about how hated it was when it was unveiled, due to its comically long and thin neck. Maybe they could saw off about half of it and piece it back together while they have it there. Still, it's an iconic part of the city and I'll be happy to see it return.

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