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Dave

I could see this generating some negativity in Oregon just because we kind of pride ourselves on our local farms, and I could see it being perceived as undermining that tradition.

However, one great advantage it would have, is that there would be very little cost of transportation from the vertical farm to the New Seasons or Pastaworks (or other places that distribute local produce in Portland).

It does seem to generally make more practical sense to a huge city like New York though. In Portland, we actually have farms within an hour drive from the center of the city, we don't have to get all our produce from halfway across the state or country.

Ethan

My understanding of the vertical farm model (as espoused by Dickson Despommier) is that it would be fed hydroponically with waste produced in urban areas - creating a closed-loop system.

I find the prospect of farm towers quite eerie. All you need to do is slap a Monsanto sign on the side of that building in the rendering and you've turned ecotopia into econightmare.

Kristin

Urban grown food? That seems a little gross. In the future either there won't be cars, buses, cranes, etc. stirring up the grime, or there won't be land left at all...

...and PDC will have to create urban renewal districts out of postage stamp neighborhoods that don't make the highest and best use of their gardens.

PG

Vertical, huh? No sweat, just make the rain and sunlight go sideways, develop super-dextrous harvesting-robots that cost nothing & never break down...then get to work solving another million engineering conundrums of this green hallucination.
Actually I've noticed lots of horizontal surfaces in a city that could produce food: the roofs of buildings.

John Russell

Could we please just get places like Vancouver, WA (where I live) enforced urban growth boundaries that aren't simply expanded for suburban sprawl at the cost of the farmland that we already have so close to town? Maps I look at show that we have something like it, but when I go out on my bike, I'll pass sign after sign for "proposed development" on what is still thankfully farmland. All of this when we still have large undeveloped lots within the city limits!

It's nice to hear how Portland is doing so well with all of this and what other cities have ideas for utilizing their land, but when I see that just across the river the opposite is happening, it makes me a tad angry.

I think that is where our opportunity lies.

Roxanne Christensen

There is a low-tech way of integrating agriculture into the built environment, and it's called SPIN-Farming. SPIN is a commercial farming system that makes it possible to earn significant income from land bases under an acre in size. It takes the challenges of urbanization and turns them to the farmer's advantage and it recasts farming as a small business in cities and towns. Sub-acre SPIN farms can be incorporated into any existing neighborhood and any new school, housing development, shopping mall, casino, condo, hospital. The applications are far-reaching once the notion of engaged and integrated agiculture is embraced.

John T

I think a "vertical farm" could succeed as a spectacle, a wry urban monument to agriculture — a public visual reminder that the food we eat is made up of growing organisms that need light, air, soil, and manual labor before they are transformed into a commodity stacked on the supermarket shelf. But as an economically feasible food production option — you gotta be kidding me! However, perhaps some marketing genius could convince wealthy foodies to pay an exorbitant premium for skyscraper-grown produce (stranger things have happened).

billb

what about solar shadow laws ?
Your farm tower is shading our
community garden , dude

kyle

this could work - maybe it is plugged into a greater community, or maybe a community within the same building.
put housing above that then uses the garden below to clean the greywater. maybe compost and blackwater for absorption chillers or fertilizer. who knows maybe even the people that tend the garden live above, and then a farmer's market and a small whatever cafe as well at the street? there could be a series of them per community that are sized to meet the needs of the community? a new community garden model.

Stephen

I really want to see this project succeed because I think this is could be a solution to are rising food shortage…I am trying to get the first working tower built: http://www.thepoint.com/campaigns/vertical-farm-in-new-york-city

Stephen

I really want to see this project succeed because I think this is could be a solution to are rising food shortage…I am trying to get the first working tower built: http://www.thepoint.com/campaigns/vertical-farm-in-new-york-city

Justin

I organize a group that is trying to help bring the first vertical farm to Portland. Please join us http://www.meetup.com/FarmUP/.

Justin

I organize a group that is trying to help bring the first vertical farm to Portland. Please join us http://www.meetup.com/FarmUP/.

Sarah

Absolutely pathetic. Enviormental interaction is essential to understanding what the word is actually about, and how divine nature is. I'm sick to my stomache thinking that we're actually considering building upwards for farm growth. What are we doing to our Earth? STOP HAVING BABIES. Industrialism is nothing but a method of eventual suicide.

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