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Joe Jenkins

Is that a sky-bridge I see in the renderings? If so, what is it connecting to, and into what area of the Cronin Block?

MarkDaMan

^Actually Joe, that is the 're-established ivy-covered truss that used to connect the brewery and warehouse.'

I like this tower. I thought I was tired of the brick same old, same old in the Pearl, but this is done very classy. I'll be interested to see it at completion. It sure has taken it awhile to get from massive hole to rising construction.

pdxstreetcar

I really like this building a lot too.

mb

I'm with Brian on this one. It's just o.k. Unfortunately, I'm sure that the developers wanted to remain on the safe side of style and program when undertaking such huge project. I think they missed the boat though on both counts. This is such a great block to work with considering the surrounding construction and neighborhood. I'm leary of how this thing will look once construction is complete. Renderings have a nice way of making brick look dainty when in fact it's quite the contrary in reality.

bob

Don't worry! I read from the Portland design review weekly pdf that there is another new building to sprout up a few blocks to the west that will literally look (and be) a giant, tall, concrete-slab above ground parking garage.

MarkDaMan

Bob, are you talking about the Safeway site? The initial renderings were quite a let down compared to the nice new Safeway in the West End.

bob

Hmm, not sure. Could be, it was quite awhile ago that I ran across that bit.

John Luttrell

Actually, the "ivy" is hops. Fitting, huh? They grow up the side of the Bridgeport Building and across the trellis over the "alley" to The Cronin Building. I work for The Cronin Company and the old building was used as a floor covering warehouse for our inventory. We have since moved to Swan Island and occupy a 225,000 square foot facility. Lots of history in that old building. Hopefully, the old solid 2x2 and 3x3 timbers were salvaged too. That old growth timber should be incorporated back into the project along with the brick.

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