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Eric Berg

"In other words, the city is receiving $10 in free renovations, and all we have to do is spend $17 million." $10 just doesn't buy as much as it used to, though.

Brian Libby

Thanks for pointing out the typo, Eric. It's now been fixed.

Fred Leeson

I agree, Brian, that the Coliseum has a bright future and that the plan should be approved. It concerns me, however, that Paul Allen -- who has scarcely proved he can manage ANYTHING -- has managerial authority for 10 years or whatever. There are so many great opportunities for that building, but I don't think he's the guy to envision them and carry them out. So I fear the MC will continue to be an under-utilized building for years to come.

Doug Kelso

Thank you, Brian, for your tireless advocacy on this matter.

As for leaving managerial authority with the Blazers for the near term, that's fine. As long as the Coliseum is protected and restored, there will be future opportunities to use it to its full potential. One obvious option is to get a WNBA team back into Portland. At 8,000 seats, the Coliseum is the perfect size for a typical WNBA crowd (averaging about 7700 to 7800 per game across the entire league).

Thurman

As I have said before, and have already said on facebook, anyone involved in this effort needs to think of the "sales" effort of it. Give it "curb appeal", the easiest and most basic thing to do. Cut down the over-grown trees around it. Install good, cheap exterior lighting and highlight its great lines at night. Put out a good, tasteful sign announcing its greatness ( no joke ). Light it well from inside. Fix minor blemishes outside. Basically, fix it up like you were going to sell it. Then, then go sell it to the public...or maybe by then you wouldn't have to!

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