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Brooks Jordan

Thanks for this update, Brian.

I was at PNCA to hear the proposals several weeks ago and felt that LAB had not necessarily the best design but the lightest, most appropriate design and so, in a sense, the strongest vision.

Rob

I am concerned that the Public Market http://www.portlandpublicmarket.com/ effort hasn't borne fruit while local farmers markets are thriving. Nonetheless, LAB's proposal has many similarities to the public market proposal. I have always felt the Burnside bridgehead was a great place for the public market vision, maybe eventually on streetcar(s) and accessible to convention-goers. Vacate the Sandy to SE 7 transition, return it to regular blocks and develop high density mixed use for an expanded residential community adjacent to the Burnside bridgehead.

dude?

what you are getting with LAB's SEED is a new place to buy tight yoga pants and frozen yogurt. It is in fact more consumeristic than the Cordish company's proposal, only geared toward the future "organic" soccer moms of america. see this link for the genre. http://stuffwhitepeoplelike.wordpress.com/

The Nitze-Stagen proposal was rooted in the fertile network of existing portland businesses, non-profits, and public institutions, it should have stood up to any blow in terms of economic ups and downs. It had the diversity of the people living on site at its roots, that diversity being intrinsic to the actual proposal. It was ambitious which, i am surprised to see here, was held against them. Another vote for mediocrity?

The white male critique of the Nitze Stagen team runs thin, especially after listening to Shaheen (of LAB) cut his wife off by literally taking the mike from her 5 times during her 5 minutes of the presentation. There was more testosterone exuded from his cheesy and overbearing personality than I could bear.
Enjoy the shopping. Hope they bring that Cali sun with their kayaks and "alternative" apparel stores.
The positive of this is having a local work by MSR Architects. Their quiet sensibility will hopefully bring some soul to the mall.

shooter

Yogurt and tight yoga pants? That's not the same proposal I read. The only reason Nitze Stagen's proposal may have sounded more rooted was because they either bent or broke the rules while developing the proposal. They should not have contacted all the institutions they did.

The Lab's proposal does include working with local institutions in a fruitful way. And they do it without burying the Mill under a bunch of condo buildings. That site should remain open. The minute you put housing on a site like that you create a certain "ownership" which makes the general public uncomfortable about using the space. What was the first of five redevelopment principles laid out by the PDC? Provide Open Space.

rita

gosh, i have been under the impression all these years that open space gets better utilized when surrounded by housing, that businesses do better when surrounded by housing, that parks feel safer/are safer when surrounded by housing.

eileen

dude?

Thanks for the hate-fueled tirade. Any other individuals, groups or life-styles you'd like to dismiss out of hand?

How do you reconcile this quote, "cut his wife off...testosterone...overbearing," with this one, "soccer moms of america."

I, for my part, don't understand why we would want to do the NS proposal...other than for the sake of doing SOMETHING. It looked like a Haussmann-inspired office move to me...more so than a development plan.

Is consumeristic bad? Hell, is it a word? What's the 'D' in PDC stand for? Would we rather that soccer moms(or anyone) spend their money here or elsewhere? Nothing is immune to economic ups and downs, especially so if they choose to spend their money elsewhere.

ben

i noticed "dude?" posted the same comment on willamette week's website. sounds like sour grapes.

i also noticed that i need to get a life.

td

Why does anyone think that the LAB proposal will require less subsidy?. Maybe I'm dense, but I don't see much in this proposal that is actually going to produce revenue to pay for the development costs. It looks like a neat park design, but unlikely to be self-sustaining economically. And let's not pretend that City Council isn't still going to stick its nose into the PDC selection and screw up the whole process. I woulnd't hold your breath for anything to happen at the site for quite some time.

shooter

There are condo towers to the south of Centennial Mills, the Pearl is growing to fill the empty space west of Naito Parkway, immediately across Naito will be The Fields park which includes a pedestrian bridge for easy access to Centennial Mills, and the River District plan calls for the 20+ acres of open land remaining in the north Pearl to be developed with even taller condo buildings. I think there will be plenty of residence buildings immediately around Centennial Mills to support the businesses there.

As for public money, The Cordish Company's proposal called for $107 million in public money, Nitze Stagen didn't give an estimate but given the size of their proposal its not unreasonable to assume it would be just as large as Cordish's request. The Lab's proposal calls for $5 million in public money. That is a huge difference. The proposal is modeled after the SEED project The Lab did in Costa Mesa, CA. Go to their website and have a look, it is self sustaining and successful.

Phil

Of the three teams proposals, I liked the Nitze-Stagen team ideas. They presented this as an opportunity to create something like a community or a neighborhood. The other two teams seemed to think of this more as a shopping / eating / entertainment destination, like a Rouse marketplace. Perhaps this will succeed as a shopping destination for Pearl residents. Call me idealistic, but I feel this is a lost opportunity if all we get is another place to spend money and buy stuff.

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