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marcs

I believe the initials in BOORA were Broome, Oringdulph, O'Toole, Rudolph, Boles & Assoc

Joseph Readdy

This is correct. When you would call the firm in the old days, you could hear the receptionist take a deep, long breath before announcing: Broome, Oringdulph, O'Toole, Rudolph, and associates.
Quite the mouthful.

Brian Libby

Okay, Boles is NOT the B. I never know what to do in these situations: Should I correct the original and make all these comments confusingly moot, correct the original and delete these comments, or just leave it?

Jay Lichtman

For anybody who visited the Grube home, you might have noticed another house two further up the street was quite similar. It was designed by Richard A Campbell (founding partner of Campbell Yost Grube, now Yost Grube Hall) and completed in 1963 as his private residence.

It has the same basic structure, including the concrete piers and A-frames as well as the wooden beams throughout. They are each built down the hill from the road and are accessible via stairs from their wooden car decks. From the outside, the main difference is that the upper floor of the Campbell house has all of its windows on the long ends, filling up the entire height and shape of the A-frame. The front deck (entrance area) is half covered. The rear cantilevered deck extends from the opposite side and gives a great view of the douglas firs outside.

For the interior, the upper floor of the Campbell house is an open area with a central fireplace and hearth, many built-in shelves, a built in couch, and a galley style kitchen. Originally, the downstairs had three small bedrooms and 1.5 baths, but an addition a few years after the house was built added large master bedroom suite with its own fireplace, sauna, and jetted tub. More recently, two of the small original bedrooms were joined together. All of the floors and ceilings are unpainted light-colored warm wood, which gives the home a very warm and "foresty" feel. From within the house, you have a tranquil view of the woods from all windows.

Originally, the downstairs had three small bedrooms and 1.5 baths, but an addition a few years after the house was built added large master bedroom suite with its own fireplace, sauna, and jetted tub. More recently, two of the small original bedrooms were joined together. All of the floors and ceilings are unpainted light-colored warm wood, which gives the home a very warm and "foresty" feel. From within the house, you have a tranquil view of the woods from all windows.

To the best of my knowledge, the Campbell home was the inspiration for the Grube home! They were partners, friends, and even next-door neighbors with matching houses. the Campbell home was the inspiration for the Grube home! They were business partners, friends, and next-door neighbors with beautiful houses.

Brian Libby

Editorial note: two self-taken photos I originally included in this post were removed by request.

IB

Good grief, they actually requested you remove the photos?

The 'no pics' thing was a real bore, we probably won't go to future tours on that point. In all the modern home tours I've been on (dozens on the West Coast) not one time have I seen a request to not take pictures.

Sure, it's their homes and they can make the rules. But a home tour with a lock down on ideas does little to spread the message of modernism, and comes across as snobby and self-importantly exclusive.

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